1MDB theft: The case against Rosmah Mansor,based on statements by Najib’s blogger “Lim Sian See”, son Riza Aziz,her lawyer Noorhajran Mohd Noor.

by Ganesh Sahathevan

The evidence concerning Rosmah Mansor’s role in the 1MDB theft,contained in statements made by her son Riza Aziz and her lawyer Noorhajran Mohd Noor   has already been published on this writer’s now disabled RealpolitikAsia blog (archived below,and cached on Google).

To that can be added statements by a blogger  who despite using only a pseudonym,”Lim Sian See”, is often quoted authoritatively by Malaysia’s state owned and/or controlled media.It is understood that he acts for and on behalf of the ruling UMNO, and hence directed by PM Najib Razak. According to “Lim” the entire US DOJ case concerning funds stolen from 1MDB is without basis because the funds in question were not stolen from 1MDB, but from Abu Dhabi’s IPIC and Aabar. 

Lim’s account therefore is in agreement with that of Riza Aziz, who claims to be the innocent recipient of some USD 95 million, which he always believed to be a gift from IPIC, a sovereign wealth fund. However, the evidence provided by Riza includes letters that speak of personal and family relationships being the basis for that gift. As shown below, it s Rosmnah Mansor who has been reported to have that level of association with the relevant parties. Accepting that improbable story of a multi-million gift from a sovereign wealth fund, Lim’s account,taken together with all the other facts, also appears to point to Rosmah as the Malaysian party responsible for what he acknowledges was theft, but from IPIC.  In doing so he removes PM Najib from the crime,leaving Rosmah as the sole Malaysian party involved in engineering the theft.

END

Some readers may wonder why Jho Low has not been mentioned above.The reason for this is the evidence that the IPIC gift was based on ties to Riza Aziz’s family.

 

 

 

 

 

Sunday, May 21, 2017

Adding to the evidence provided by Riza Aziz against Mummy ::Rosmah’s lawyer Noorhajran did not deny that Rosmah Mansor is a signatory for the Eric Tan/Jho Low BSI accounts

by Ganesh Sahathevan

Rosmah Mansor - victim of malicious fake news disseminated by irresponsible and unscrupulous quarters.

It has been previously reported on this blog that evidence of Rosmah Mansor’s is emerging,out of documents filed in the US, as Riza Aziz fights the DOJ to recover assets acquired with funds 
stolen from 1MDB.

These revelations should be read with this earlier article by this article from a related blog,where Rosmah’s lawyer did not deny that she was a signatory for the Eric Tan/Jho Low accounts at the former BSI Bank.
Taken together there is evidence of Rosmah’s role at the main and subsidiary levels of the 1MDB theft,directing the flow from the original theft,and then managing the funds parked in various subsidiary accounts.

END

 
JAN
17

Rosmah’s lawyer Noorhajran does not deny that Rosmah Mansor is a signatory for the Eric Tan/Jho Low BSI accounts

by Ganesh Sahathevan

From Malaysia Outlook:

The legal firm of Messrs Noorhajran Mohd Noor has been authorised by Datin Seri Rosmah Mansor (hereinafter referred to as the ‘client’) to issue this media statement

This is a general statement issued on behalf of the client to the public pertaining to accusations and falsifications of facts against Datin Seri Rosmah Mansor.

Attention is drawn to a story carried by bloggers and social media postings recently.

The allegations are those to the innuendoes made that “Rosmah was the one who signed the cheques as Eric Tan”.
This media statement is issued, in relation to above, cross-referenced with the statement of facts made by the Attorney-General of Singapore dated Jan 10, 2017 pertaining to the case of Public Prosecutor v Jens Fred Sturzenegger.

Through the statement of facts issued by the AG’s Chamber of Singapore, there was nothing mentioned in the said statement indicative of the allegations made in the social media of the purported role played by Rosmah Mansor.

These allegations are serious, intended to make representations, publishes imputations intending to harm or knowing or having reasons to believe that such imputations will harm the reputation and done with malicious intent to destroy and reduce credibility of Rosmah Mansor as the wife the Prime Minister of Malaysia Dato Seri Mohd Najib Tun Abdul Razak.

However , that is not what is alleged by the Sarawak Report story on Eric Tan and Rosmah Mansor, which has been quoted and referred to by others.The relevant parts of the Sarawak Report story state:

Who was the actual signatory on the accounts?

That Tan was actually Low confirms the point made by Sarawak Report that someone who has stolen billions of dollars would be highly unlikely to trust the money in the hands of another.  It was for this reason that it was obvious Low would not have put a genuine associate in control of these vast accounts.
However, Low was not the only player behind this sorry saga and there were others who likewise were anxious for their own assurances.
Sarawak Report has heard through very well-placed sources that there was therefore a check on the use of these accounts, which was that the actual signatory was not Jho nor Eric, but someone else.  That signature was needed to authorise payments.
Sarawak Report has been told that this signatory was a woman with whom Jho Low was closely associated in the matter of 1MDB.  So, when insiders informed us over a year ago that Rosmah Mansor had complained over Jho Low’s spending, exclaiming “It’s my money as well”, perhaps this is what they were referring to?
Put simply, Sarawak Report alleges that Rosmah Mansor’s signature was required for any disbursements from the account. Rosmah’s lawyer Noorhajran Mohd Noor has not denied that and instead denied forgery. A simple ,somewhat child like attempt to deny something that is not, in an attempt to be seen to be denying the allegation.
END
Who Was The Signatory On The Eric Tan Account?

Who Was The Signatory On The 

Eric Tan Account?

Last week Sarawak Report connected the dots and concluded that the name of ‘Eric Tan’, the beneficial owner of several 1MDB related bank accounts, appeared to be merely an alias for the master-mind behind the thefts, Jho Low.
Now, the Singapore court has confirmed this suspicion, explaining that the Falcon Bank branch boss, Jans Sturzenegger, had confessed that Jho Low told him he used the identity on certain occasions ‘for security purposes‘. Sturzenegger was sentenced to 28 weeks jail and a fine for initially lying to the authorities and failing to report suspicious transactions, making him the first western banker to be convicted in this affair.

Jans Sturzeneggar 'saw Eric Tan's passport'

However, Sturzenegger is also reported as having claimed that he knew Eric Tan did actually exist, because he had been provided with a passport and a CV.
Anyone who has opened a bank account will know that somewhat more proof of identity than that is generally required to open an account – most particularly the would-be account holder needs to present themselves at the bank. In fact, Low had just impersonated Tan.
But, this matter now presses most on the Swiss side of the investigation. Sturzenegger, after all, was fairly far down the food chain at Falcon Bank and he was plainly carrying out his bosses’ orders. In particular, the CEO Eduardo Leemann, who first introduced ‘Eric Tan’ to Sturzenegger by email in January of 2012. The Singapore manager had not realised that his correspondent erickimloong.tan@gmail.com was Jho Low until he met him the following month.
The same Swiss bosses then pressured Sturzenegger to pass some $1.2 billion through these 1MDB related accounts, even though he was fearful and suspicious it might be money-laundering. He knew he should have reported the enormous transactions.

Acting casual in Dubai, Eduardo Leemann

A former Goldman Sachs senior executive before moving to Falcon, Leemann has in the past seen fit to lecture that there needs to be far less regulation of banks. We suggest that his conduct makes clear that the exact opposite is the case and the Swiss prosecutors should make him and his colleagues a powerful example.
Criminal proceedings against Falcon were announced in Swizerland on 13th October. Two days earlier the regulator FINMA had recommended charges against two of its former senior executives, which Sarawak Report speculated ought include Leemann.
Meanwhile, the enormous half billion dollar backhanders to the over-all Abu Dhabi Aabar boss, Khadem Al Quabaisi, becomes more explicable – he had put his sovereign wealth fund and its private bank at the disposal of Jho Low to launder money from 1MDB.
What the Singapore authorities need to answer more fully is how their own flagship bank, Standard Chartered also ended up running a bogus Eric Tan account on behalf of Jho Low, laundering hundreds of millions through the so-called Blackstone Asia Real Estate Partners account.?
Why has Standard Chartered, by contrast, got off relatively lightly with a low key investigation and a modest fine – were they not equally culpable of funnelling hundreds of millions through an account run by a front?

Who was the actual signatory on the accounts?

That Tan was actually Low confirms the point made by Sarawak Report that someone who has stolen billions of dollars would be highly unlikely to trust the money in the hands of another.  It was for this reason that it was obvious Low would not have put a genuine associate in control of these vast accounts.
However, Low was not the only player behind this sorry saga and there were others who likewise were anxious for their own assurances.
Sarawak Report has heard through very well-placed sources that there was therefore a check on the use of these accounts, which was that the actual signatory was not Jho nor Eric, but someone else.  That signature was needed to authorise payments.
Sarawak Report has been told that this signatory was a woman with whom Jho Low was closely associated in the matter of 1MDB.  So, when insiders informed us over a year ago that Rosmah Mansor had complained over Jho Low’s spending, exclaiming “It’s my money as well”, perhaps this is what they were referring to?